connect, grow & thrive.

Travelling to and from Switzerland – July 2021

Finding out what applies to travel to and from Switzerland right now is like trying to draw a line in quicksand. What was correct at the time of writing may have changed by tomorrow, so in any case be sure to check the official websites of both Switzerland and the country you plan to visit before booking traveling.

Travelling TO Switzerland.

The main factor to consider before anything else is whether you are coming from a high risk country or not.

Countries not considered high risk on July 5.

The following countries are NOT considered high risk by the Swiss government: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Sweden, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain.

Other countries: Albania, Andorra, Australia, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Lebanon, Macao, Monaco, New Zealand, North Macedonia, Rwanda, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, United States of America.

All other countries are on the list of high-risk countries and regions. Entry restrictions continue to apply to persons entering Switzerland from these countries. If you are planning on traveling from one of these countries we recommend you check this website to see what the requirements are.

What are the requirements to enter Switzerland?

Anyone entering Switzerland from a non high risk country as a tourist by plane needs to fill out an entry form.

If you are not fully vaccinated or unable to prove that you have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months, you will have to present proof of a negative PCR test or rapid antigen test. If you are entering Switzerland by airplane, or within the last 10 days before entering Switzerland, you have been in a place with a variant of concern.

Children under the age of 16 are never required to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test on entering Switzerland. They are exempt from the test requirement on boarding and from the test requirement at the Swiss border.

Who needs to quarantine?

If you are coming from a high risk country (see list above for countries not on list) and cannot prove that you have been doubly vaccinated or had Covid-19 you will need to quarantine.

For more information as to what the requirements are, go to this travelcheck website.

Which vaccine is recognised in Switzerland?

The following vaccinations are accepted in Switzerland:

  • Pfizer/BioNTech (BNT162b2 / Comirnaty® / Tozinameran)
  • Moderna (mRNA-1273 / Spikevax / COVID-19 vaccine Moderna)
  • AstraZeneca (AZD1222 Vaxzevria®/ Covishield™)
  • Janssen / Johnson & Johnson (Ad26.COV2.S)
  • Sinopharm / BIBP (SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine (Vero Cell))
  • Sinovac (CoronaVac)

Travelling abroad FROM Switzerland

UPDATE: The Swiss Vaccination Certificate App is now recognised by the EU, but you need to have had your second vaccine at least 14 days prior for it to be recognised in many countries.

We recommend you contact the official representatives of the country you are visiting to find out what the rules in place are. This website also gives you links for the various countries.

The TCS website also has a very useful tool for 200 destinations and what the rules are. Unfortunately the information is only available in French, German or Italian. Here is a summary of the requirements needed for our four neighbouring countries.

Austria: Since May 19 people traveling to Austria have to prove that they have either been doubly vaccinated, had Covid 19 in the past 6 months or present a PCR test (no older than 72 hours) or a rapid antigen test (no older than 48 hours). You also need to fill out an entry form which you can find here.

France: To enter France people need to prove that they have either been doubly vaccinated, had Covid 19 in the past 6 months or present a PCR test (no older than 72 hours) or a rapid antigen test (no older than 48 hours). As well as entering the following form.

Germany: Since June 20. there are no more requirements for people driving or taking the train unless you come from a region considered high risk. if you fly into Germany you will need to either prove that you have been doubly vaccinated, have had Covid-19 in the past 6 months or have a negative PCR test.

Italy: People traveling to Italy must fill out the following form. Show proof that you have been doubly vaccinated, have had Covid-19 in the past 6 months or have a negative PCR or rapid antigenic test which is no older than 48 hours.

Reopen.Europa is a great website for further traveling information within Europe.

As the Delta variant continues to spread, it is important to check the rules applying to wherever you wish to go because things could change quite suddenly.

If you need to test, know that test centres are pretty booked up so the sooner you book your appointment the better your chances are. Know that you do not have to pay for antigenic tests, even if they are for traveling, whereas PCR tests for travel purpose will have to be paid for by you. To find out about more test centres read our post on the topic.

charlie.hartmann@livinginluzern.swiss

Charlie Hartmann is the managing director of the Livingin organisation which focuses on helping international residents connect, grow and thrive in Switzerland.

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